The Therian Temple or, how not to start a werewolf religion

I READ ON ANOTHER THERIAN* WEBSITE THAT YOUR TEMPLE IS AN EVIL CULT. IS THIS TRUE?

People are often afraid and, in turn, hateful of, things they do not Understand.
This often leads them to say uninformed or ignorant things about people who do not share their own viewpoint.
To some people, any group which deals with Magic or the Metaphysical is a “cult”.
To some people, anything unfamiliar is “evil”.
Decide for yourself.

In my post on the Elenari, I discussed how a community of self-proclaimed “space elves” fell down a deep hole of unverified personal gnosis, weaving a tower of memoryscapes that eventually collapsed under its own weight, leaving nothing like it outside certain insular communities.

Therianthropes, people who identify as existent animals in a spiritual or mental sense, never quite had to worry about that. You don’t really need to parse complicated “memories” of where you came from when you’re just an animal. You’re a wolf. You remember being a wolf. Doing wolf things.

But that hasn’t stopped individuals from trying to give therianthropy a more strict, even religious skew, and while the Therian Temple wasn’t the first, they may be the most infamous.

The origins of the Therian Temple are in message board posts trying to sway new members; alas, most of the contemporaneous reaction is lost to the internet’s ceaseless march of site death, though threads like this one capture the general hostility with which they were met (also, random Islamophobia and the r-slur, because 2006). What we can know is that the Therian Temple began in 2006 and was gone by 2010; therianthropy & Otherkin historian House of Chimeras says only a “handful” of members ever joined, if even that, and contemporary accounts confirm that. So why, then, was the Therian Temple controversial?

First of all, the attempt to impose religion, codes, and even a Bible on an individualistic community that already faced false accusations of being a cult or religion.

Said Bible was written by the Temple’s founder and “high priestess”.

Said Bible also cost $30.

More on that later.

The beliefs of the Temple drew notice for a very strange reason. The Temple’s website was redesigned between 2006 and 2007, and the later is more graphical – and more defensive about one of the group’s key tenets:

1. DO NOT PARTAKE IN CANNIBALISTIC ACTIVITY.
As part-Human and part-Animal, we are not to eat the flesh of either kin.
We must maintain a plant-based diet.

Amid guidelines to respect the Earth, avoid prison, and avoid “deadening” activities, the Therian Temple forbids its members from eating animal meat – on the basis of cannibalism.

To say this is controversial is an understatement. Any therian can be a vegan or vegetarian, but there’s something bizarre about urging people who identify as carnivorous animals to not eat other animals, not for environmental or ethical reasons, but for “cannibalism”. Is a wolf eating a deer a cannibal? In what sense do they share close kinship?

A member of GaiaOnline raises objections; elsewhere, one claims the Therian Bible was written “hundreds of years ago”

Obviously sensitive to criticism (or of potential loss of dues-paying members), the 2007 version of the Therian Temple tries to explain their reasoning:

WHY DO YOU FOLLOW A VEGAN DIET? WHAT IF MY ANIMAL SIDE IS CARNIVOROUS, SHOULDN’T I BE AS WELL?
Therians, having Human physiology, cannot digest raw meat as an Animal does,
so therefore there is no way to follow the diet of one’s Animal side, without facing serious health risks.
The plant based diet is one element to help attain the healthiest physical condition
of your Human body that is ideal for Ritual Magic.
In short, we believe the best physical condition
for the most effective ritual magic is attained by a plant based diet.
This does not mean that you may never eat meat, but that it is “most effective”
to abstain from it during times when one is practicing ritual magic.
No one is “excommunicated” from this Temple over diet issues.

This is obvious backpedaling, trying to find a reason that doesn’t also call a predator eating prey a cannibal. A similar tone is taken by the Temple’s FAQ, which keeps flailing at explaining how a group called a Temple is “not a religion”. But it does tie into another controversial element of the Therian Temple: magic.

While many therians are pagan, the two are not synonymous, and there’s no tradition of “therian magic”. But the Therian Temple melded the two, and “Therian Magic” is a centerpiece of the Therian Bible. The six-ranked membership structure required demonstration of “real-world application of therian magic” to reach the advanced ranks, and even more to be entitled to perform therian services, such as weddings, funerals, baptisms (?) and last rites (?), though the site helpfully says you can’t do a therian circumcision. All for a low, low cost of $150 for members and $350 for non-members.

That there’s no such thing as a therian version of any of those rituals goes without saying, though at least by 2007 the Therian Bible became a free download – though a $30 donation was still required for basic membership, and to earn that sweet wedding discount. A version of the Bible with two extra appendices was offered, in case anyone still wanted to give the Therian Temple even more money.

Another sore subject in the therianthrope community is p-shifting, the idea that some people can physically shift into their animal form. To say that this has never happened is a waste of words; while the Temple didn’t outright advance p-shifting as an actual thing, it did promote a more muted variant, where some people reportedly gained enhanced strength or senses without a full transformation.

Still impossible, though.

On the left: the theta-delta symbol for therianthropy.
On the right: the Therian Temple’s theriogram (buyable as a lapel pin, 2 for $1 deal for members!)

The Therian Temple stormed into a community claiming to have all the answers, if you pay a small fee; crafting its own symbols and traditions and foisting them on a hostile audience, all while acting like it was absurd to call a self-proclaimed Temple hawking a literal Bible a “religion”.

But what exactly was in their $30 Therian Bible? We can never know. Unless someone uploaded it online. And unless you can read it now. And unless I read it.

I read it.

Shout out to beginning your book by reminding people to read it from beginning to end, so as to stop people who read books sideways, or middle to front, as they do.

The first pages just repeat the “codes” & “truths” of the site, but with added commentary; the third therian truth, that therians are born, not made (don’t you hear how special you are, reader?) , gains a note that those who aren’t born therians (we know how special you are, you can trust us) can study therianthropy their whole life and die human (but you won’t, not if you give us your money, move up the ranks, and we’ll tell you the truth); it also calls out humans who “get scratched by a Wolf” to become a wolf, you know, as people so commonly do. Sadly, the Bible doesn’t try to defend its rule on cannibalism.

The exclusive bits, the guide to “therian magic”, starts with the extreme basics of basics. “Master” humanity by interacting with people; figure out what your theriotype is first, as if anyone who didn’t already identify with an animal dropped $30 on a Therian Bible. Those who don’t live in an area with abundant nature are commanded to move, lest they “face extinction”; therians are also advised to not tell humans about their nature, as “Humans cannot understand the Knowledge”.

The “mental shift”, a common occurrence in therian communities where people say they temporarily take on the instincts and mindset of their theriotype, the most commonly reported type of “shift” in therianthropy, is described as dangerous, high-level therian magic (only we can truly teach you, not them, $150 please for a therian baptism).

All therian magic so described is a basic part of therianthropy, turned into a ritual that amounts to little more than positive thinking. Call on your theriotype to take your problems away (wolves are famed for their CBT training); p-shifting is that, plus an extra step where you briefly pretend to run around like your theriotype to become them (that’s why four-year olds pretending to be cats are always turning into half-felines).

What the Therian Bible lacked was an editor; humans who try to be therians are “watsing their time”, we’re helpfully informed that “as therians, we ate still human in physical form”, and warned to be physically strong and not intoxicated before we “attemt the M-shift”. The book as a whole runs 24 pages, many of them cribbed word-for-word from the website; with little information on what exactly the book was, many ordered it out of blind curiosity – and got a booklet in the mail. A booklet whose tone verges on insulting.

Acknowledgements are given to Anton LaVey, vampires, and nature, and then this paltry tome  ends with a note that it’s all property of the authors, who now make music about nationalism using a Nazi symbol on the cover, so take that as you will.

As for the Therian Temple itself, it’s long since vanished, the occasional resurfacing of its Bible the only sign it ever existed. While it’s easy to dismiss them for their obvious ridiculousness, we’d be better off if we didn’t. Because everything was in place for the Therian Temple to bilk vulnerable people out of their money & evolve into a full cult, and the fact that they didn’t gain any followers is not a sign that it could never happen, but a happy fluke. Any tightly-bound subculture could birth a Therian Temple, and unfortunately they won’t all be so incompetent.

Exopolitics, Eisenhower & the Fuzzier Expanses of UFOlogy

On the night and early hours of February 20-21, 1954, while on a ‘vacation’ to Palm Springs, California, President Dwight Eisenhower went missing and allegedly was taken to Edwards Air force base for a secret meeting.

Those who believe that the government – or, at least, some nebulous “they” – already know about aliens may have that belief in common, but little else – including when, exactly, contact began. Was it Roswell? Was it some secret landing at Area 51? Or did a purported dentist appointment of Eisenhower’s act as cover for him meeting with aliens, as witnessed by an astrally-projected occultist?

The answer will not surprise you.

Thus is the story of the Greada (or, sometimes, Grenada) treaty of 1954, a cornerstone for a certain, fuzzier expanse of UFOlogy.

The story of the treaty is this: during a visit to Palm Springs in 1954, President Eisenhower vanished for an evening. Though the press was told he had an embarrassing dentist’s appointment, in fact he was spirited away to Edwards Air Force Base to meet with grey aliens. With them he signed, or at least arranged to sign, a treaty ensuring secrecy and non-interference. All this was, of course, covered up.

Our only source for this momentous event is a man named Gerald Light.

My dear Friend: I have just returned from Muroc. The report is true — devastatingly true!…

When we were allowed to enter the restricted section… had the distinct feeling that the world had come to an end with fantastic realism. For I have never seen so many human beings in a state of complete collapse and confusion, as they realized that their own world had indeed ended with such finality as to beggar description. The reality of the “other plane” aeroforms is now and forever removed from the realms of speculation…

H.P. Lovecraft just called, he said your prose is too purple & ambiguous.

During my two days’ visit I saw five separate and distinct types of aircraft being studied and handled by our Air Force officials — with the assistance and permission of the Etherians! I have no words to express my reactions.

If you can pick out any word from this dense word melange, it should be “Etherians”. More on that.

President Eisenhower, as you may already know, was spirited over to Muroc one night during his visit to Palm Springs recently. And it is my conviction that he will ignore the terrific conflict between the various ‘authorities’ and go directly to the people via radio and television — if the impasse continues much longer. From what I could gather, an official statement to the country is being prepared for delivery about the middle of May.

Spoiler alert: he didn’t.

I will leave it to your own excellent powers of deduction to construct a fitting picture of the mental and emotional pandemonium that is now shattering the consciousness of hundreds of our scientific “authorities”… In some instance I could not stifle a wave of pity that arose in my own being as I watched the pathetic bewilderment of rather brilliant brains struggling to make some sort of rational explanation which would enable them to retain their familiar theories and concepts.

Not one of the world’s physicists could understand what happened, but me, a weirdo in a UFO cult, could figure it out intuitively.

To watch strong minds cringe before totally irreconcilable aspects of “science” is not a pleasant thing. I had forgotten how commonplace things as dematerialization of “solid” objects had become to my own mind.

We get it. You’ve seen some shit. You’re Gerald Light, GREATEST HUMAN, and all the sheeple are educated stupid. I am nature’s four-day simultaneous not giving a shit.

The coming and going of an etheric, or spirit, body has been so familiar to me these many years I had forgotten that such a manifestation could snap the mental balance of a man not so conditioned. I shall never forget those forty-eight hours at Muroc!

And neither shall the world…but why?

Information about Gerald Light is scarce; William H Moore of UFO Casebook call him an “elderly mystic” with a belief in “out-of-body experiences”. Blogger Håkan Blomqvist dived into Light’s cheaply-printed mystical booklets, finding him to be a clairvoyant almost supernaturally drawn to…the Chicago World’s Fair. Blomqvist finds his work tiresome and confusing, with a worldview based around Etherian Masters, and concludes, as Moore did, that Light was likely implying he “saw” Eisenhower’s meeting via astral projection.

What are the Etherians so referenced by Light?

The work of early UFOlogist Meade Layne – the recipient of Light’s letter – proposed the Etheria hypothesis to UFOs.

Etheria is here — if we know what here means! Along‐side, inside, outside of our world. Because our world, that is, the so‐called dense matter of the objects in our world, is a rarefaction.

In Layne’s conception of the world, aliens come not from the stars, but from here – or a here next to “our” here.

The matter of the Etheric world! Inside the molecules, inside the atoms, other atoms — still other atoms inside of those, or ten thousand Chinese eggs each inside of another.

And that is why Etheria is here! But it is also everywhere. All heavenly bodies have an etheric realm.

Layne explains “flying discs” as etheric craft, made of etheric matter imperceptible to us. Light was an adherent of Layne’s; another associate was Mark Probert, a “medium” who helped Layne discern his theories, spread primarily via cheaply-printed booklets.

The story of Eisenhower’s first contact originates from such a meager source: a forgotten mystic, a little-known UFOlogist, a theory about aliens that’s long since vanished into the aether. So why did the story persist?

I’ll answer that, but first, let’s talk about aliens.

By Joe Nickell
Odd how only Greys started to visit Earth once movies/shows adopted them as aliens du jour

When the UFO craze began, aliens were often little green – or grey – men or, most commonly, “Nordics” – human-looking white blonde people from space. This held through the 50s, reinforced by, primarily, the narratives of “contactees”, who claimed a kind of proto-alien abduction or to have channeled alien knowledge. In the 60s-70s, modern alien abduction narratives began, UFOlogy – and pseudoscience as a whole – took on a more scientific air, and you had a endless variety of reported aliens: this was the era of Mothman, the Flatwoods Monster, and a million other weirdos. By the 80s and 90s, in part due to the book Communion, aliens in the popular mind became fixed as greys, the Mothman & her friends were pushed into cryptozoology. and the more scientific-sounding abduction narrative became codified.

Modern UFOlogists are fuzzy on the specifics. They don’t weave tales of wars in the stars, or secret first contacts, or even concrete conspiracies. They’re reactive. They deal in sightings, witness reports – or, in other words, evidence, of a kind. It has the veneer of science, if not the mantle of it.

But the original culture didn’t really go away. A community of “channelers”, concerned by “exopolitics” and, especially, the pretty white people they imagine live among the Pleiades still exists, carrying on 50s UFO culture. Sometimes these two cultures intersect: the idea of an alien base at Dulce in New Mexico hails from the “exopolitics” community, as does Gerald Light’s letter, which so inspired UFOlogists it led to one tracking down a dentist’s widow to ask if she remembered her husband treating Eisenhower (no, apparently).

Though the legend stayed alive throughout the 70s-80s, a history by Michael E Salla of Exopolitics identifies its modern revival with William Cooper, a conspiracy theorist known for his 1991 book Behold a Pale Horse (and a radio show that potentially inspired the Oklahoma City bombers). Within its 500 pages, he kickstarts HIV/AIDS conspiracy theories, weaved a Illuminati theory that brought them to the fore of conspiracism, popularized the term “sheeple” and, of course, detailed how Eisenhower met with aliens.

In Cooper’s conception, Eisenhower first met with “white-haired Nordics that had pale blue eyes and colorless lips” who demanded humanity demolish its nuclear weapons. He rejected them, and later entered into a treaty with greys from Betelgeuse (or perhaps Zeta Reticulum; Salla tells us that this discrepancy obviously means the Greys from Betelgeuse and Zeta Reticulum are related).

But who is Cooper? He claims high-level Air Force security clearance that let him know about this clandestine meeting; in fact, records show Cooper’s service was as a petty officer in the Navy. Nearly every “whistleblower” claiming knowledge of Eisenhower’s supposed meeting claims high-level military service; I don’t doubt every single one has a similarly unimpressive, or even non-existent, service record.

Cooper claims that the Greys broke the “treaty” almost immediately, and other theorists propose that this betrayal caused the sea change in UFO reports in the 60s:

…the space brothers in the 1950’s…were kind, interacted with people who became known as contactees, and took people for rides in their space crafts. This pattern changed dramatically with the abduction of Betty and Barney Hill in the early 1960’s…the first abduction of the Hills began a new pattern where the aliens were grey “evil” aliens who would abduct people against their will, and perform medical procedures on them. There were, as far as this author is aware no confirmed cases of “classic” abductions in the 1950’s. Unlike the “good” space brothers of the 1950’s these grey aliens were described by all, who were unfortunate enough to have met with them, as being distant and without emotions.

UFOlogy has changed. The stock portrayal of what an alien is has changed, from the perfectly-human Nordics of the 50s to the slightly-inhuman Greys of now. Peaceful “contactee” accounts faded in favor of violent abduction narratives, and their supposed motives shifted from a vague optimism to more sinister ends.

But the old stories don’t really go away. The spiritualist, optimistic bent of atomic-age UFOlogy stays alive in every UFO cult, from Unarius to Starseeds to ZetaTalk to Aetherius, whose beliefs in “cosmic masters” mirror Light’s & Layne’s. And sometimes one elderly mystic’s xeroxed account of seeing Eisenhower talk with aliens survives the decades, embellished by alleged whistleblowers and other collaborative mythmakers into a larger tale of alien treaties and war among the stars.

In 1954, Eisenhower went to the dentist. And some people still theorize about it today.

Anyway, he was actually meeting with his boyfriend Z’A’Kranax & I support their love? Love is love, happy Pride!

Living on the Fringe: Space Elves and the Origin of Otherkin

Beyond the normal reaches of our society lies an endless array of others: some living, some dead; some known, some obscure. This is about the fringe of the fringe.

Otherkin were perhaps once best known as “those people online who think they’re dragons”; now they’re best known as “those people on Tumblr who think they’re anime characters”; but in truth, the origins and history of Otherkin date back much further than most might expect.

A quick definition of terms. Otherkin, or “kin”, are a subculture that identify as nonhuman. This is commonly a spiritual, “I was this in my past life”, identification, but some Otherkin believe their identity is psychological in nature. Otherkin traditionally identify with fictional creatures, such as elves, dragons or fae. A closely related concept is therianthropy; therians instead identify with animals that, whether currently living or extinct, exist. A relatively new addition to the nomenclature are “fictionkin”¹, who identify with fictional characters; unlike Otherkin or therians, many fictionkin identify with beings that, while fictional, are generally human.

Otherkin and therians claim to experience their identity in different ways: via memories, and via “shifts” – commonly mental shifts in behavior, sensory shifts in perception, or “phantom shifts”, where they feel their identity reassert its body via phantom, ie mental, limbs. It is important to note that Otherkin and therians do not claim to physically change, and so-called “p-shifters” are usually a laughingstock in the kin community.

Though today it’s seen as a youth subculture, Otherkin trace their origin to the burgeoning pagan & new age movements of the 1970s. An invaluable timeline by Orion Scribner places the first group that we would today call “Otherkin” in at least 1975, when a group called the Elf Queen’s Daughters placed their first public ad in a pagan quarterly. The term itself dates to 1990, invented as a catch-all for the many non-elven identities Otherkin now possessed; therianthropy found a name and a home on Usenet circa 1994.

But all that can wait. Today, we’re zeroing in one specific facet of the Otherkin community: a elfkin subculture with an involved mythology that flourished briefly, but brightly.

The Elenari started on now-lost mailing lists in the late 90s; in 2000, a newly-created site called the Elenari Nexus became the community’s home.

Continue reading

Living on the Fringe: When Anti-Vaxxers thought their children were aliens

Beyond the normal reaches of our society lies an endless array of others: some living, some dead; some known, some obscure. This is about the fringe of the fringe.

Adherents of fringe beliefs don’t tend to see reason when their favorite nonsense is debunked; they just slide on to tanother. They go effortlessly from Gamergate to Pizzagate to QAnon(gate) with nary a bit of self-awareness; from the Rapture of 2011 to the “Mayan” apocalypse of 2012 to the arrival of Nibiru in 2017; from starting a Final Fantasy cult to starting a Hannibal cult. Yes, really.

When this happens, the old bullshit tends to go down the memory hole. And so it is with anti-vaccine maven Jenny McCarthy, who’s done all she can to bury that she once explained her son’s autism not with debunked science, but by believing she, and him, were literally magic.

Such is the way of the Indigo Child believer: the precursor to anti-vax, and a strange movement in its own right.


McCarthy’s awakening came when a woman on the street yelled at her.

No, really. Someone told her that she was an Indigo & her son was a Crystal child. And on the word of a Lady Screaming On The Street, she found her purpose in life.

McCarthy embraced the Indigo child identity hard, but only a few years later, she deleted all pages about her belief in Indigo children – and her crusade against vaccines began.

But what exactly were Indigo Children? And how were they related to anti-vaxxers?


Well, let’s look them up. In a delightful field of embarrassingly sincere artwork, we find a succinct, 14-point checklist of Signs You May Be An Indigo Child:

This is a narrow list that limits Indigo Children exclusively to: every overly-sincere-and-awkward teen; every liberal arts student who just discovered politics; every Weird Horse Girl. Wow, truly a paranormal phenomenon at work.

But the Indigo Child phenomenon relied on its vagueness, on the ability of just about any mom to fit their child into their rubric. Other countdowns make it even more weaselly: you may have had a difficult childhood. Or a nice one. The Indigo Child tent is big. Pagan author Lorna Tedder claimed every pagan mom she knew had an “Indigo child”, and some believers claim as many as 95% of children are born with Indigo or Crystal ~ E N E R G I E S ~

But what are Indigo Children?


To put it simply, Indigo Children are children born with indigo auras, and Crystal Children are children born with crystal auras.

“Ah”, I hear you say. “Ah.”

The internet’s most respectable resource, Crystalinks dot com, seems surprisingly dubious on the phenomenon, but does quote the original 10-point indigo child list:

They come into the world with a feeling of royalty (and often act like it).

They have a feeling of “deserving to be here,” and are surprised when others don’t share that.

Self-worth is not a big issue; they often tell the parents “who they are.”

They have difficulty with absolute authority (authority without explanation or choice).

They simply will not do certain things; for example, waiting in line is difficult for them.

They get frustrated with systems that are ritually oriented and don’t require creative thought.

They often see better ways of doing things, both at home and in school, which makes them seem like “system busters” (nonconforming to any system).

They seem antisocial unless they are with their own kind. If there are no others of like consciousness around them, they often turn inward, feeling like no other human understands them. School is often extremely difficult for them socially.

They will not respond to “guilt” discipline (“Wait till your father gets home and finds out what you did”).

They are not shy in letting it be known what they need.

“Born feeling like royalty”, does not follow rules, doesn’t respond to consequences – a magical indigo child, or a rich kid? The results will NOT surprise you!

Commentary on the Indigo child is effusive in its praise, but hazy in the specifics. Indigo children have ‘special auras’. Indigo children will ‘change the world’. But what of the specifics? Let’s look at THIS reasonable looking site:

“Put simply, thousands of years ago we began to “think” instead of “feel.””

Ah.

“With past as our guide, we gave our power to the ego, which made us fearful. The intellect caused us to lose our connection to the collective consciousness, making us feel alone.”

Ah,

“Some adults have been able to gain at least a part of this former knowing. They in turn are giving birth to children who remember how the collective consciousness works and they are using it. The indigo offspring is their descendant.”

Ah…

But this site lays bare the truth. A Indigo child ‘bores easily’. Is ‘prone to insomnia’. ‘Has a history of depression’.

“Has probably been diagnosed as having ADD or ADHD”.


Indigo children were almost universally children with ADD or ADHD, raised by parents who would rather believe their child was an alien than that their child need Ritalin.

And here is where we see the seed that birthed anti-vaxxers; that made their transition from talking about auras to talking about debunked medical science.

“Indigo Children who take Ritlin or other psychotropic drugs soon lose touch with their intuition, psychic abilities, and warrior personality. These children were sent to Earth with these three spiritual gifts for the express purpose of cleaning up our planet, environmentally and socially.” Care and Feeding of Your Indigo Child, Doreen Virtue

Suppressive drugs such as Ritlin, can cause an indigo child to forget their life’s purpose, which only delays what HAS to change on our earth for us to continue living on it.

Indigo parents believed their children didn’t really have ADHD; in fact, ritalin suppressed their natural, magical gifts, and so parents should deny their children medicine that could help them.

One of the reasons an indigo, crystal or rainbow child has trouble sleeping is because wayward spirits are attracted to them. These spirits know these children can see and sense them. This makes them more irritable and restless in school. The schools and doctors decide from this they are ADHD or ADD.

Crystal children, meanwhile, were typically diagnosed with autism. And that’s how Jenny McCarthy found her way from crystal auras to antivax: how people went from denying their children medicine so as to not ‘suppress’ their gifts, to suspecting the medicine itself was the problem. From a more outré type of denialism – doctors are trying to drug the MAGIC out of your ALIEN ghost child! – to the more simple “this one discredited doctor’s study proves this vaccine is bunk, so let’s bring back measles.”

But both are related to hatred of their children – of love that’s conditional. Indigo and crystal children believers could only love their ADD-diagnosed child if they could rationalize it as them really being special in some way; vaccine believers would rather their children be dead than autistic. And both abuse their children by withholding healthcare. Neither is kooky or harmless; and when anti-vaxxers finally disappear, let us hope they disappear for good, and don’t move on to something new.

…though there are also New Agers who think their kids are literal aliens. Or angels. So uh, not holding my breath.

The Curious Case of Marilyn Monroe’s Purported Reincarnation

marilyn

Here is a vintage case: the tale of a Canadian singer who believed herself to be Marilyn Monroe reborn, and the doctor who believed her. It hails from ye olde 2005, and has been immortalized in the book Marilyn Monroe Returns: The Healing of a Soul, which has a mighty four stars on Amazon after nineteen reviews. Despite the overall positive rating, the top reviews are all distinctly negative – with even believers in reincarnation calling the book’s case a stretch.

You may regard reincarnation as primarily a spiritual matter: a process where, upon death, a person’s soul moves on to another body – which may be completely different, and may indeed – depending on the belief system – not even be human. But Dr. Adrian Finkelstein believes reincarnation to be an altogether different process. Namely, one can decode a individual’s past lives not via hypnotic regression or memories, but because they look similar to their prior self:

Dr. Finkelstein become convinced that Ms. Laird is indeed the reincarnation of Ms. Monroe, not only due to her memories, but also due to the presence of similarities in facial bone structure, hands, handwriting, voice pattern, linguistics and personality traits that exist between Marilyn Monroe and Sherrie Lea Laird.

I can understand the same soul showing the same personality across lives, but the same bone structure? The same physical appearance? Does a reincarnated soul warp their new form into its favored appearance, or does it specifically seek out fetuses that will grow up to look like their past self?

Ms. Laird, who goes by the stage name, Sherrie Lea, is a singer whose production of No Ordinary Love hit the top of the charts in Canada and Europe. It is interesting to note that in her film Bus Stop, Marilyn’s role was of a singer named Cherie.

So Marilyn Monroe is reborn, and she names herself – not Marilyn, not Norma, but to…a name that’s kind of similar to one of her characters.

Sherrie Lea Laird experienced vivid memories of her life as Marilyn Monroe, but more importantly, she looks just like her:

sherrie

MY GOD, THE RESEMBLANCE IS UNCANNY! Continue reading

Water With Nothing In It That Protects Against A Threat That Doesn’t Exist: Only 20 Bucks!

Homeopathy is the idea that medicine without anything in it is the most potent medicine of all. Chemtrails are a conspiracy theory among people really freaked out by contrails. And now, they meet: for just twenty dollars, you can buy some homeopathic chemtrail detox formula off of eBay! Don’t worry; the seller has 99% positive feedback, so they can be trusted!

r/conspiratard user CBLF breaks down the “ingredients” in this formula and they’d be quite worrying, if there was even one particle of them left in this twenty-dollar water that “cures” something that doesn’t exist. Homeopathy, everyone!